How Coca Cola Devotionally Lived Up To Maya Angelou’s ‘Marketing’ Gospel And Philosophy

This is a derivative from this article: The Two Most Important Quotes in Marketing – One is Obviously By the Late Maya Angelou: Becoming an Authority and Expert in Customers’ Eyes – Tiisetso Maloma Blog https://buff.ly/2BLtwTY

We want our products to sell.

Maya Angelou gave one of the most fantastic quotes that many sellers and marketers have cherished and adapted.

She said: “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

To me, this is one of the top quotes in marketing and product to apply as gospel and philosophy

May her soul Rest in Peace. She went through a lot in her life, and yet she chose to still be a pillar of strength and liveliness to the world.

This is how Coca Cola fantastically applied her quote:

In 2018, Coca Cola brought it’s 2011 ‘Share a Coke’ campaign back. The campaign is about writing people’s names on Coke cans.

In 2015 it was estimated that the campaign increased Coke sales by 7% among young adults in Australia, and by 2% in the USA.

The campaign is a success because it leaves people feeling something good about their self. The feeling of seeing your name – even a Pedi or Zulu name – on a Coke can is good and you want to achieve it by buying the Coke.

Brian Solis summed up such a scenario nicely by saying: “If we spent less time ‘talking’ about our brand and brand promise and more time designing how we bring it to life, the experience divide would naturally narrow.”

Coca Cola designed just that through the Share a Coke campaign.

Humans are selfish emotional beings. They adopt a thing that makes them feel good. A self-fulfilling truth.

A lot of people don’t necessarily wear Gucci for the designs. They wear it for how it makes them feel. They wear it for the lie it tells them about themselves, and the supposed lie it tells about them to others (even if people don’t believe the lie). The lie is that they are a success.

In our marketing campaigns or business pitches, we should leave our prospects (e.g. audience, potential clients) feeling something that will work to our advantage in getting their business.

Another way to address this is, as Seth Godin said and wrote in his book, ‘Marketers are Liars.’ Meaning they don’t tell a direct lie, they take or create a moving story (‘but people will never forget how you made them feel’) and attach their product.

The best lie, sorry I mean story, going on in South Africa is about Rooibos and moringa. Scientifically they are proven to be good for people’s health. A lot of product creators now attach or add ‘rooibos’ or ‘moringa’ to their products. The products sell on the sentiment/story that ‘rooibos’ and ‘moringa’ have health benefits.

They create different rooibos infused products. E.g. there are separate teas for apparently cleansing the bladder, kidneys and the colon. These products sell in thousands. I doubt the products have been tested to conclude that mixing moringa and rooibos in them achieves the health benefits these herbs achieve. Merely mentioned that you’ve fused them in is a sales point.

It makes people feel good that they are drinking something healthy.

Framework questions to achieve this

  1. How do I create the feeling Maya talked about through stories? (e.g. ads, broadcasting testimonials, activations)
  2. How do I build the feeling into the product like Share a Coke?
  3. How do I add marketing innovations like fusing rooibos and moringa into products?

This is how to deliver a brand story or promise.

For us is to keep conceptualizing and brainstorming ways of achieving the above.

– –

This is a derivative from this article: The Two Most Important Quotes in Marketing – One is Obviously By the Late Maya Angelou: Becoming an Authority and Expert in Customers’ Eyes – Tiisetso Maloma Blog https://buff.ly/2BLtwTY